ELIAN D. ALVAREZ

- VENTURE CAPITAL - ANGEL INVESTMENT -
- ENTREPRENEURSHIP - LATAM - INNOVATION -
- INVESTMENTS - PRIVATE EQUITY - FINANCE -

How Important is Experience in Venture Capital?

Apr
21

In the world of information and technology, innovation is a key factor that drives the economy. Media is filled with success stories of founders in the Silicon Valley. On the other side of it, however, stands the venture capitalists who help these entrepreneurs materialize their dreams into successful businesses.

The venture capital sector in the United States is considered one of the key sectors that contributed to its economic growth. With the passage of time, the industry has faced massive growth around the globe and there is an increasing competition among investors to make it big. Some of the famous venture capitalists of earlier times are Tom Perkins, Tommy Davis, and Arthur Rock. In addition to the capital, it was their investing knowledge and experience that contributed toward the expansion of a tech industry.

 

Do You Need Talent for Venture Investing?

The venture capital industry has continuously evolved during the past few decades, and with that, some contradictions are brewing in the market. For example, the investors who dominate the market claim that they know how to choose a winner who would experience the same success as Facebook or Twitter did, yet, they expand the horizon of their bets, hoping that at least one of these will make it big.

This gives rise to a question:

Do you need talent for venture investing?

If so, what would it be?

The answer to this is simple; no! You do not need any special talent. Accounting or financial modelling skills are useful for venture capitalists, but it is important to note that early stage companies are not the same as public markets. In fact, they are run by owners who are still paving their way to success. The only thing that counts is the experience and skill of people who have already worked with startups and are ready to do whatever the job demands. Moreover, there is a common perception in the market that venture capitalists with a huge network of proven founders are the right choice, yet, you cannot rule out the fact that proven founders tend to ask for big checks, which reduces the share of a limited partner. New venture capital firms, on the other hand, are hungry to win and have the drive to listen to what startups want.

 

No Transparency in the Venture Capital Market

The venture capital market is not transparent, which is good news for venture capitalists, but not for the general public. Venture capitalists usually put their cash in long term investments, due to which, their outcome is not immediately visible. Therefore, it is difficult to measure the success and failure of any investment in the short run. Only a few estimations are publicly made available to compare the relative performance of one venture capital firm against another.

 

European Investment Fund – Evaluating Venture Capitalists Performance

European Investment Fund (EIF) is one of the very few institutions that have great access to venture capitalist funds for many years. In a recent report by EIF, analysis was conducted on the activities performed by venture capital firms in Europe over the last 20 years. Between 1996 and 2015, there were more than a thousand startups that were fueled by 355 EIF backed funds. According to the report, venture capitalists who were investing for the first time performed equally well as venture capitalists (VCs) with broader knowledge and experience, especially when the economy is booming.

 

Experience and Skills Matter

However, the explanation given in the EIF report was quite ordinary as they claimed to have good skills when it comes to choosing venture capital funds. It was further stated in the report that even the new VCs that have their backing perform well. But it did not have the coherence with another conclusion they reached in the same report, i.e., venture capital firms that carry out investments for the first time give a worse performance when markets are not doing well and these are the times when experience plays a vital role in defining the outcome of any investment.

 

This gives rise to another aspect of VC investing that is opposite to the perception of the industry; selecting a winning startup during the times when markets are booming is something newbies do as good as the experienced ones do, yet, the real test lies in avoiding losers and this can only be achieved with experience and the right skills.

Lithuania Government and Venture Capital

Feb
16

The past research shows that the role of governments to activate the VC market is a result of direct or indirect public policy measures. They choose the optimal measures that focus on timely economic issues and also encourage private investors to fund the sector where there is insufficient capital. Different governments around the globe are making efforts to increase the development of innovative SMEs (Small and Medium Enterprises). Although, VC market is normally talked about in the context of developed countries, such as the U.S., UK, Japan, Canada, France, Australia, etc., but in 2007, a joint initiative, called the Joint European Resources for Micro to Medium Enterprises or JEREMIE, happened to take place in Lithuania and other European states.

 

What is JEREMIE and its Purpose?

The JEREMIE initiative was an effort made by the European Commission and European Investment Fund (EIF) in collaboration with the European Investment Bank Group and other financial intermediaries to have a coherence among the EU. It was formed to distribute a portion of the EU Structural Funds through new risk finance initiatives for innovative SMEs.

In 2009, Lithuania experienced a dramatic emergence of VC funds as the agreement was signed with the EIF to implement the JEREMIE initiative in the region. Moreover, VC association was also established in the country. Lithuania is known as one of the leading countries in terms of the JEREMIE holding fund agreement – a fund managed by EIF and includes pre-seed and VC fund, co-investment fund, portfolio guarantees, and credits.

 

Emergence of Financial Intermediaries in Lithuania

In 2010, three financial institutions, a consortium of MES Invest and STRATA, LitCapital, and BaltCap were chosen for equity instruments. The last two have been established to manage VC funds, whereas, the first one is for the management of Business Angels co-investment fund.

 

Launch of Seed and VC Fund

A year after the emergence of financial intermediaries, Seed and Venture Capital Fund was launched in Lithuania under the JEREMIE initiative and a team of professionals titled CEE Capital was appointed by the EIF to manage it. The purpose of this fund was to enable the establishment of seed fund in Lithuania that is supported by the State. According to the newsletter published on the website of Ministry of Economy of Lithuania Republic, the size of this fund was approximately EUR 20.7 million and its aim was to extend financial support to Lithuanian firms that have a high growth potential. It was fueled by the Structural funds that were allocated to the JEREMIE holding fund under the management of EIF. It primarily provides capital to companies that are at seed stage of the development and also help in the further expansion of new enterprises.

Although, implementation of the JEREMIE initiative increased the amount of risk capital for SMEs in the country, yet, only a few investments were made in the innovative enterprises.

 

Baltic Innovation Fund

The Baltic Innovation fund, also known as the fund of fund initiative, was formed in 2012 by the EIF in collaboration with the government of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. It was created to boost the equity investment into Baltic SMEs having a great growth potential. The fund represented the investment of 52 million euros by EIF, along with the 26 million euros from each Baltic government. The aim of this fund was to focus on the Baltic States during the period of four years between 2013 and 2017 through a funds-of-funds process in order to bring more private capital and also to introduce the best market standards for equity investment in enterprises. This opportunity can definitely improve the competitiveness and employment situation in the region.

 

Progress in the VC Sector

  • The number of firms that got VC capital increased from 5 in 2011 to 16 in 2012. In 2014, the number eventually rose to 23.
  • According to Enterprise Lithuania (government agency), 63 startups were funded during the period of eight years with a capital of 101.5 trillion euros.
  • There were about 320 tech startups in the country by 2016 according to the statistics provided by The Lithuanian Private Equity and Venture Capital Association, Startup Lithuania, and Practica Capital.

Last year, Cabinet of Ministers in Lithuania approved legislation that would make the process of permanent residency easier for non EU/EEA citizens who want to do innovative businesses in the country. The VC market in Lithuania is not yet developed and its progress is really slow. However, the public initiatives would give a boost to national VC market in the country.